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Director of Online Marketing for Salesforce Work.com. Fascinated with all aspects of digital marketing and social business. David has posted 99 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

The 6 Fatal Flaws of Performance Reviews

09.19.2013
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The 6 Fatal Flaws of Performance Reviews

Let’s face it, performance reviews are flawed.  Nobody seems to like them, and they don’t really help performance. So, is there a better way?  Yes! Work.com makes performance reviews easy–performance reviews that actually improve performance, and engage employees and managers in working better together.

1 – THEY AREN’T ABOUT PERFORMANCE.  Performance reviews aren’t really about improving performance.  They are obligatory chores–we spend time and energy creating them—but we don’t actually look to them to help drive performance of individuals and teams.

2 – ABRASIVE.  Let’s face it, performance reviews don’t exactly help relationships between employees and managers.  In most cases performance reviews are subjective and they don’t give a 360 perspective on performance.

3 – TIME CONSUMING.  It’s tough to write your own, but what if you have 20 direct reports?  Ya, welcome to the pain train.

4 – STALE and INACCURATE.  Most companies review performance only once a year.  In most cases performance reviews are subjective and they don’t give a 360 perspective on performance.  How valuable can feedback be if it’s is only done once a year?

5 – ONE-SIDED.  Managers know what to expect from their employees but the employees don’t know what to expect from their managers.

6 – TEDIOUS and MANUAL. Performance reviews are a manual and tedious process.  Every time we create a review, we need to manually take stock of what has happened in the performance period.  We then need to write the review, setup meetings, get sign-offs, etc.

We’re sure their are more, so feel free to add in the comments below!

Published at DZone with permission of its author, David Austin.

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