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By rsmiller
via itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com
Published: May 07 2013 / 13:50

After I read a Wall Street Journal article suggesting mobile wasn't making us more productive, I realized it was a load of bunk because there are countless examples of mobile making individuals and entire businesses more productive. I share some of them.
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Greg Brown replied ago:

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"How about Uber, which is has driven traditional taxi companies to distraction"..."Using a mobile and social model, Airbnb lets you search for a place to stay, contact the owner directly and make arrangements". Both of these are certainly convenient, but that doesn't necessarily translate to increased productivity. "The social comes into play because you can rate and comment on the quality of the stay" - also not directly related to increased productivity. "There are countless other stories of massive increases in efficiency and productivity being extracted from mobile." You may want to consider adding some of these other examples, because the two cited in the article definitely don't substantiate the claim that "mobile" = "more productive".

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rsmiller replied ago:

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My point is that these applications have made the process more productive from a business perspective. It's a lot more efficient to call a taxi on your smartphone and watch it come to you in real time, than it is to stand on the corner and try to flag a taxi, assuming there is one. It's a lot more efficient to use Airbnb than it is to work with a travel website. If it's easier for customers, they are going to gravitate to it -- and they have.

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Greg Brown replied ago:

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As I said - these applications are certainly convenient. However, I don't think they are good examples of how mobile apps or devices can help improve productivity. For example, if I was trying to sell my boss on the idea of getting everyone in my department an iPad, I don't think I'd use these particular examples. They don't clearly demonstrate the value (in my opinion, anyways). By the way - I'm not saying I disagree with you. I just don't think these examples make a very good argument. ,

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rsmiller replied ago:

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Fair enough. But certainly the third example I cited should help.

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Greg Brown replied ago:

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Yes, absolutely. I missed that one the first time I read the article. Thanks for pointing it out.

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rsmiller replied ago:

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Sure thing. I hope you got something out of it.

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rsmiller replied ago:

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And you also could bring the first two examples to your boss, as creative ways to solve problems using mobile. If you could apply that same type of creativity and imagination to whatever you do, whether to simplify operations internally or to make it easier for your external customers to interact with your products and services, there's certainly great value in that.

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