Link Details

Link 512459 thumbnail
User 225256 avatar

By mswatcher
via theregister.co.uk
Published: Nov 08 2010 / 05:15

Oracle will deliver two Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) based on the OpenJDK project - one free and the other paid. That's according to Tweets pouring thick and fast from an Oracle session at QCon San Francisco, where the database giant mostly repeated its earlier plans for Java.
  • 14
  • 0
  • 3912
  • 1

Comments

Add your comment
User 338269 avatar

Miloskov replied ago:

-1 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

There is it, Oracle did it what everybody expected. O course the free JVM will not have all the goodies of the paying one. This is the end of Java folks. I was using Java cause it is free and it was opensource with an open standard and it was really true multi-platform but with all the BS lately with Oracle and Apple etc. They ruined Java once and for all.

Long Live Java but for me is already a dead language.

Or Maybe already people begin to believe that we need a Java fork to disband us from Oracle evil tactics.

User 60102 avatar

jodastephen replied ago:

0 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

There are some key indications that this is just JRockit under a new name, rather than anything new.

User 60102 avatar

jodastephen replied ago:

2 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

This turned out to be no news. Oracle is merging the two JVMs at the technical level, but keeping the business model of paid extras in management tools and real-time. The core JVM remains fully-featured, heavily invested in, gratis and free via OpenJDK.

"Oracle is currently working to merge the Oracle Java HotSpot Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and the Oracle JRockit JVM into a converged offering that leverages the best features of each of these market-leading implementations. Oracle plans to contribute the results of the combined Oracle Java HotSpot and Oracle JRockit JVMs to the OpenJDK project. The Oracle JDK and Java Runtime Environment (JRE) will continue to be available as free downloads, with no changes to the existing licensing models. Premium offerings such as JRockit Mission Control, JRockit Real Time, Java for Business and Enterprise Support will continue to be made available for an additional charge."
http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/press/173782

User 299252 avatar

kicolobo replied ago:

0 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

Please, explain-me something: what is the problem of knowing that there's a premium version of the JVM?

By the way, there's nothing new here, because JRockit for a long time as a PAY product and no proble arise from it.

User 728591 avatar

storm14k replied ago:

2 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

Now isn't this splitting Java? I'm assuming that tie-ins to the middleware mean features directly in the language that aren't a part of a framework. So if you write for the premium version you are then stuck there. Maybe I'm thinking about this in the wrong way.

User 306525 avatar

Dave Newton replied ago:

0 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

Yep, I believe you are.

User 299252 avatar

kicolobo replied ago:

0 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

Just to remember, Java is a specification. You are free to create your own implementation and do with it whatever you want.

So, here's no spliting here, just another implementation wich will be a pay product.
Just to remember: one thing is open source, another is philanthropy.

User 338269 avatar

Miloskov replied ago:

2 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

Java a spec?, You are free to create your own??, What happen to Apache Harmony that they could not get a TCK and lately Google got sued cause using a subset of Harmony. Nah Java is not a standard ISO spec and Java is not free of patents and copyrights. Java is Oracle proprietary that right now happen to have a GPL license but that Oracle could change it everything soon.

Oracle have a huge marketing and sales department that they will try to get you to the premium edition and after few years let in the dust the free one cause already the big companies that need supports to conform their management department will prefer the premium and Oracle will be so happy and enough with just that and let die the Java community and Java opensource. Me I see this very very bad situation for Java as a Java developer. For management people this is the same thing cause anyway they have to pay for support.

User 728591 avatar

storm14k replied ago:

0 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

I've been wondering why people continue to claim that Java is free when Oracle's lawsuit against Google clearly states the opposite. Apparently you aren't free to implement a subset or even use and redistribute just a subset or merge just the pieces of Java that you want into your own system. There are restrictions. Now I'm not saying the owners of Java don't have the right to restrict the usage of their product but I believe we should call a spade a spade. Java is not free for you to use as you wish.

However I'm curious. Why is it that all of the other languages and platforms that are free don't have to guard ferociously against fragmentation. Does base Java extend to far beyond the language and basic standard set of classes? It seems like most frameworks and libraries work in most places with other languages. With Java it seems like there a lot more things that have to spec so that your code works as expected.

User 393686 avatar

RawThinkTank replied ago:

1 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

IBM must sue Oracle for fragmentation of Java

User 338269 avatar

Miloskov replied ago:

2 votes Vote down Vote up Reply

The only solution is the Apache Harmony project to replace and fork OpenJDK as a platform of choice for Java development and ask to IBM to protect the Apache Software Foundation with their massive patent stock as they did with Linux against SCO. Apache Harmony could be the solution to a free Java like platform. Google, IBM, SAP and everybody could win with this and let Oracle in the dust with their Java premium overpriced crap.

Add your comment


Html tags not supported. Reply is editable for 5 minutes. Use [code lang="java|ruby|sql|css|xml"][/code] to post code snippets.

Apache Hadoop
Written by: Piotr Krewski
Featured Refcardz: Top Refcardz:
  1. Play
  2. Akka
  3. Design Patterns
  4. OO JS
  5. Cont. Delivery
  1. Play
  2. Java Performance
  3. Akka
  4. REST
  5. Java